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  • edrickespina20152 posted a photo:

    Picture of the day for September 8, 2017

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 8, 2017: Night view with Christmas patterns of the facade of the town hall of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. The building was built in 1799 over the former town hall building and is the result of 2 different stages: the first one, Neoclassical, started in 1799 by Torcuato Benjumeda, and a second one of Isabelline style, work of García del Álamo in 1861. commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ayuntamiento_de_C%C3%A1di...

  • antonio.velardo posted a photo:

    Antonio Velardo shares Picture of the day for September 8, 2017

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 8, 2017: Night view with Christmas patterns of the facade of the town hall of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. The building was built in 1799 over the former town hall building and is the result of 2 different stages: the first one, Neoclassical, started in 1799 by Torcuato Benjumeda, and a second one of Isabelline style, work of García del Álamo in 1861. ift.tt/2xQFqY5

  • eric_litvin_orm posted a photo:

    Eric Litvin presents Wikipedia's Picture of the day for September 8, 2017

    Eric Litvin presents the Wikipedia picture of the day on September 8, 2017: Night view with Christmas patterns of the facade of the town hall of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. The building was built in 1799 over the former town hall building and is the result of 2 different stages: the first one, Neoclassical, started in 1799 by Torcuato Benjumeda, and a second one of Isabelline style, work of García del Álamo in 1861. ift.tt/2xQFqY5

  • crystal.hunt posted a photo:

    Picture of the day

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 8, 2017: Night view with Christmas patterns of the facade of the town hall of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. The building was built in 1799 over the former town hall building and is the result of 2 different stages: the first one, Neoclassical, started in 1799 by Torcuato Benjumeda, and a second one of Isabelline style, work of García del Álamo in 1861. ift.tt/2xQFqY5

  • Brendon Schafer posted a photo:

    Picture of the day for September 8, 2017

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 8, 2017: Night view with Christmas patterns of the facade of the town hall of Cádiz, Andalusia, Spain. The building was built in 1799 over the former town hall building and is the result of 2 different stages: the first one, Neoclassical, started in 1799 by Torcuato Benjumeda, and a second one of Isabelline style, work of García del Álamo in 1861. ift.tt/2xQFqY5

  • michaeldonovan22 posted a photo:

    Workers at Norris Dam, Tennessee Valley Authority, November 3, 1933.

    Photographed by Lewis Wickes Hine.

  • dewelch posted a photo:

    Kupe Sculpture at Wellington Harbor From the plaque attached to the sculpture… "Matahourua Te Waka, Ko Kupe Te Tangata, Ko Hine Te Aparangi Te Wahine Hupe Raiatea the explorer, his wife Hine Te Aparangi, and Pekahourangi the Tohunga, sight Aotearoa, New Z

    via Instagram

  • DONOSTIA KULTURA posted a photo:

    Argia_Mozal Legea

    "Mozal Legea".
    Egilea: Joseba Larratxe.
    Argia aldizkariaren azalerako egindako marrazkia.

  • eric_litvin_orm posted a photo:

    Eric Litvin presents Wikipedia's Picture of the day for September 7, 2017

    Eric Litvin presents the Wikipedia picture of the day on September 7, 2017: A female Campo flicker woodpecker (Colaptes campestris) to celebrate Brazil's Independence Day (7 September 1822). ift.tt/2wHGobw

  • crystal.hunt posted a photo:

    Picture of the day

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 7, 2017: A female Campo flicker woodpecker (Colaptes campestris) to celebrate Brazil's Independence Day (7 September 1822). ift.tt/2wHGobw

  • Brendon Schafer posted a photo:

    Picture of the day for September 7, 2017

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 7, 2017: A female Campo flicker woodpecker (Colaptes campestris) to celebrate Brazil's Independence Day (7 September 1822). ift.tt/2wHGobw

  • antonio.velardo posted a photo:

    Antonio Velardo shares Picture of the day for September 7, 2017

    Wikipedia picture of the day on September 7, 2017: A female Campo flicker woodpecker (Colaptes campestris) to celebrate Brazil's Independence Day (7 September 1822). ift.tt/2wHGobw

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324553

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324555

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324556

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324536

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324541

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324548

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324545

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.

  • infomatique posted a photo:

    BOHERMORE VICTORIAN CEMETERY IN GALWAY [RESTING PLACE OF THE FAMOUS AND NOT SO FAMOUS]-1324530

    Rencently I have noticed cemeteries in Ireland being described as ‘Victorian Era’ rather than ‘Victorian Style’.

    Last year I described this as a Victorian Style Graveyard but some people disagreed with this discription … For example one person commented as follows “ Victorian Style means meandering paths, lots of trees, and some water features to make it more like a park to visit. Also, Victorian cemeteries tend to be a bit more non-conformist with religious affiliation, but Bohermore, as you saw, is still very religious and pretty much just laid out to maximize the use of space.”

    According to Wikipedia “The origins of the Victorian cemetery were based on Victorian ideas of regulation and structure, much like other parts of Victorian society such as workhouses, asylums and prisons. The Victorian cemetery was a new way of burying people due to innovative landscape design and architecture. After 1800 dedicated garden cemeteries were created to solve earlier problems with overcrowding and sanitation. Their designs were based on the idea of Arcadia.”

    Bohermore is located in Galway, Ireland. The name is derived from the Irish literally meaning "the big road". On the last day of my 2016 visit to Galway I walked at random around the area and came across this interesting cemetery and it was not what I would have expected if I had been looking for it. It is very well organised, well maintained and rather modern which may explain why the locals refer to it as the ’new cemetery’. This year, during a break in the weather, I revisited the cemetery but for some reason I was not as impressed as I had been back in 2016 but I cannot explain why I was less impressed.