Web

Web

  • World Wide Web World Wide WebAn information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource...
  • Spider web Spider webA device created by a spider out of proteinaceous spider silk extruded from its spinnerets...
  • Web (web browser) Web (web browser) A free software web browser for the GNOME desktop environment.

"Web" in the news

People discussing "Web"

  • Stock Vector: Dark BLUE vector layout with bright snowflakes. Shining colored illustration with snow in christmas s… https://t.co/cTewanwQ4X
    s_maria_2015, Canada at Mon, 20 Nov 02:20:05
  • 【相互フォロー歓迎】WordPressやHTML、CSS、イラレやフォトショといったWEB系・クリエイティブ系ノウハウを公開! https://t.co/7n7HRAmqav #wordpress #plugin #html5 #web #webdesign #相互フォロー
    SIE_MediaDiv, at Mon, 20 Nov 02:20:02
  • RT @arunfreelance: #tech #cyber #web #tamil #india #hack #nellai #freelance #hackread #bitcoin #website #tamilnilam #html #computer #scienc…
    html_css_bot, London, England at Mon, 20 Nov 02:16:34
  • Running a popular Content management solution on #Web #App for Containers https://t.co/YHmZgJz9Xh https://t.co/pXCHJfHj7n
    SEO_Autoblog, USA at Mon, 20 Nov 02:15:36
  • 【これは凄い】Google Web Designer が発表されたぞ! - NAVER まとめ https://t.co/btUiwdqpkx #CSS3 #HTML5 #Web #Google #tool #naver #IT #news
    follow_sougo_c, at Mon, 20 Nov 02:15:08
  • RT @GilliFab: Prete bolognese sul #web: "ha fatto più morti #Riina o la #Bonino?" La butto lì: LE CROCIATE? #19novembre
    p33racy, world at Mon, 20 Nov 02:15:03
  • 25 Facts and Figures About SEO Marketing That Anyone With a Business Needs to Know. #SEO #Marketing #Business #Web https://t.co/YlQ2WFektS
    rosalinedigital, Toronto, Ontario at Mon, 20 Nov 02:14:23
  • Employee moral is at an all time high! ##web #fun #wholesome
    USFCAweb, San Francisco, CA at Mon, 20 Nov 02:12:55
  • ¡Social Media Reporter está disponible! https://t.co/LmZWBwDAkb #communitymanager #web
    Status_sm, at Mon, 20 Nov 02:09:43
  • Visite nuestro sitio web > https://t.co/n8ShxweuGY #DiseñoGráfico #Web #MarketingDigital #SocialMedia https://t.co/5IOwNR6MWs
    hrauldiaz, Chile at Mon, 20 Nov 02:08:47
  • https://t.co/yib9eo8R1M, el portal para encontrar pareja y amigos cristianos online #Web https://t.co/AoarAsNniO
    TrinopediaMX, México at Mon, 20 Nov 02:07:05

Web videos

"Web" images

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    5 Must-Have Instagram Tools

    via WordPress ift.tt/2gM2osx

    Marketing on Instagram made easy (and measurable) with these 5 tools.

    5 Must-Have Instagram Tools

    Unlike Facebook, Instagram doesn’t exactly make it easy for marketers to do their jobs. These tools circumvent that problem.Source

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Web Design Ledger – By Web Designers For Web Designers

    via WordPress ift.tt/2eKRZNm

    All marketers and graphic designers know that when it comes to corporate communication, a good logo design is one of the most important tools. It doesn’t just provide an easy way to recognize the identity of your business, but also allows your audience to know who you are and what your business is related to….

    Thanks to our friends from Vengage, the coolest infographic maker on the market, you can view and share this article as an Infographic. If you’re running an online business or work in the online marketing field, you are most probably aware of the growing need for quality content that can attract new visitors and convert…

    Online communication is an important part of any corporate marketing strategy. Therefore, redesigning your actual website or developing an absolutely new one is always something you have to do regularly, but it’s also a time-consuming job. If you redesign or add new features to your website, for sure you don’t want to lose your loyal…

    Fly Me to the Moon Landing Page in Adobe Muse. No Coding Skills Required. Hey, what’s up Muser! Today we are going to create a unique landing page using a few different animation widgets from ift.tt/1UnmBVj. The landing page we’ll be creating can be found here: bit.ly/2imMqtd In this video tutorial we’ll be doing…

    My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code. So… today for the first time ever! I would like to introduce the new member of the Fyresite team, Mason…

    Having a smartphone or a tablet is something common these days. Therefore, it’s hard to imagine our day-to-day life without apps that make it much easier and simpler. Whether it’s social media, entertainment, dating, sports, time management, or even the weather, there is something for everyone. But an app that’s difficult to figure out how…

    Needless to say, the website has become the face of any company nowadays, regardless of its size or area of activity. Since the Internet is the go-to choice for most people, every business struggles to achieve an impeccable image online. Moreover, they tend to adopt the latest trends in communication to a certain extent. But…

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Style Guides For Web Projects: Tips & Guidelines

    via WordPress ift.tt/2eKDrgv

    Large design projects require style guides for branding, identity, and consistency in writing. But these large projects also deserve style guides for their websites too.

    A website style guide cover page elements that should be universal to a design. Consider things like buttons, page sections, typography, forms, and other related styles. With a web style guide these features are in one place to help other designers match the project’s style.

    In this post I’ll share tips for creating a usable web style guide that highlights all the stuff that helps designers the most. If you follow these guidelines you’re sure to create style guides that work well and cover all the important design features.

    Write Clear Statements

    Each page in the guide should be concise and to the point. Style guides should not be lengthy technical documents.

    They’re created as visual guidelines for designers & project managers, so the style guide’s layout should reflect that.

    Take a peek at MailChimp’s Email Design Guide. It’s easy to read as one vertical column streaming down the page.

    It also uses a clear table of contents for organizing the guide into sections. You can skip ahead to guidelines for images, fonts, layouts, or anything else.

    Notice how each section is concise and to the point. These style guides are not meant to be essays or philosophical debates. Designers just want to gather required information in the fewest amount of words.

    The Frontify brand guide is another fantastic example of a style guide on the web. It does have sections for site identity but this style guide is mostly for the website’s design features.

    You can browse through webfonts, colors, spacing, and each of these sections has internal links for sub-sections of the page.

    And notice how the colors page is crystal clear. The colors are neatly organized with color codes for HEX, RGB, CMYK, and PMS. You can even download digital color swatches directly as .ASE files.

    Clarity isn’t something you look for. It should be apparent from the very first pageload.

    Design your web style guides with clear intent and remove all excess content. Focus primarily on visuals and use writing to explain how these visuals should be implemented.

    These are some other well-organized style guides you can look into:

    Organize Guides By Topic

    Think of a website’s style guide much like an online brand book. When you open the first page you should see a list of chapters and sections to browse.

    You can add sections with a table of contents and make it easy for anyone to skip around. But you’ll also have to consider what to cover and how to split up the guide.

    All style guides focus on style but websites should have certain sections in their guides:

    Typography

    Colors/textures

    Iconography

    Layout & containers

    Buttons

    Forms

    Animation

    That last point is really important because UX animation is a hot topic in today’s digital ecosystem. Animation expert Val Head covered this in her blog stating unequivocally that animation “absolutely belongs in your style guides”.

    The above example from Marvel points to their animation guide. It’s a chapter nestled deep in their web style guide and it covers very specific guidelines for timing & easing.

    These animations can be applied to anything. Dropdown menus, animated buttons, slideshows, pretty much any element on the page that moves.

    If your web project uses animation then it should have a consistent theme. The same ideas apply to web typography, buttons, and form inputs.

    But how you structure the guide does matter. It’s the difference between a usable style guide and a jumbled mess of suggestions for designers.

    Take a look at Yelp’s style guide.

    They’re an Internet company so their style guide is only made for the web. It covers features called “patterns” which get the most attention in the floating sidebar.

    Also notice how their style guide is just one long page. You can keep scrolling and hitting different sections as you go. Navigation menus, page containers, buttons, and even custom objects all have their own sections.

    Different style guides place varying degrees of importance on different elements. You’ll have to make the call deciding which elements deserve the most attention in your guide.

    And just for good measure I’d like to share one not-so-organized example. The Code For America style guide uses a hidden menu that you need to click to open. But the menu only loads different pages, not different parts of the guide.

    So their style guide is literally one long stream of content with no glossary, table of contents, or any sort of useful browsing tool.

    Do not just plop everything onto one page and call it a day. It’s the worst way to “organize” anything, especially a complex style guide.

    Without picking on CFA I just want to use their example as what not to do in your own work. It’s also a good example of why organization really does make a difference.

    Use Visuals To Share Ideas

    Web style guides are visual in nature. They’re made for other designers to clone styles and common page elements. This means visual examples help a lot more than words.

    Add plenty of visuals to every section of the guide. These visuals should serve to demonstrate examples of whatever you’re covering whether it’s headers, image captions, or form inputs.

    My favorite example is the US Web Design Standards style guide. It’s one of the few things that bureaucracy didn’t ruin because it needs to be accessible to everyone.

    Each section includes plenty of visuals with optional code snippets. The alerts page is a pristine example of this.

    And the side navigation stays fixed all the way on every page so you constantly have access to the navigation.

    Buffer does something very similar in their style guide which is a bit smaller. But their visuals help to sell each element by showing how it can be used in a real-world scenario.

    Try to think practically when designing your style guides. People reading these guides want to implement real solutions and it helps to have something to study.

    Buffer’s style guide includes examples with live embedded elements on the page. These all include the CSS class and the type of feature whether it’s a blockquote or a social sharing button.

    And while we’re learning from examples I’ll drop this link to Drupal’s style guide. It uses almost no visual examples and the ones they do have are very limited.

    As you can tell it’s tough getting any real value from this guide. Not to say Drupal has poor taste in design or that their guide isn’t valuable.

    However the organization is poor and the lack of visuals really ruins comprehension.

    Web style guides are made for visuals on the web. So use plenty of these visuals when you’re actually creating the guide.

    Add Writing & Tone Guidelines

    Visuals are obviously needed for all visual aspects of a website. But most websites are made up of written content. This is why some style guides include sections on voice in writing.

    I’ll admit, this isn’t a huge area to concern yourself with.

    However it can make a big difference in the final product if you’re willing to put down voice guidelines for copywriters & bloggers. Especially if the site has a lot of written copy.

    A fine example is the TutsPlus guide covering tone for writers. This includes people who contribute to the blog and people who create premium courses.

    Notice these pages focus on how writers should create content. It covers very specific rules about pronouns, contractions, and addressing the reader directly.

    All of these rules work specifically for TutsPlus. Writing for a different blog may require a totally different ruleset. A content-heavy website would be foolish to not include a voice section in their style guide.

    You can learn just by studying live examples or reading articles on this subject. But the goal is to make a consistent theme with writing, just like how style guides aim for a consistent theme in design.

    But voice & tone style guides are unique to each site. Their layout and structure will be very different, and their content will vary drastically.

    Yes every site wants properly written content with no grammatical mistakes. But the tone, cadence, and technical style always vary.

    Take a look over this style manual for an idea of how you could structure your guide. This isn’t really a style guide, but it does follow a similar formula to study for page design and content structure.

    Parting Words

    Making a great style guide is all about organizing the most useful features into the best order. From there it’s just repetition until you have all the elements added.

    I hope this post can help designers working on their own web style guides. The first one you create probably won’t be awesome. But if you focus on improving the ease of use you’ll have a much easier time planning & constructing valuable style guides.

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Web Design Ledger – By Web Designers For Web Designers

    via WordPress ift.tt/2eKRZNm

    All marketers and graphic designers know that when it comes to corporate communication, a good logo design is one of the most important tools. It doesn’t just provide an easy way to recognize the identity of your business, but also allows your audience to know who you are and what your business is related to….

    Thanks to our friends from Vengage, the coolest infographic maker on the market, you can view and share this article as an Infographic. If you’re running an online business or work in the online marketing field, you are most probably aware of the growing need for quality content that can attract new visitors and convert…

    Online communication is an important part of any corporate marketing strategy. Therefore, redesigning your actual website or developing an absolutely new one is always something you have to do regularly, but it’s also a time-consuming job. If you redesign or add new features to your website, for sure you don’t want to lose your loyal…

    Fly Me to the Moon Landing Page in Adobe Muse. No Coding Skills Required. Hey, what’s up Muser! Today we are going to create a unique landing page using a few different animation widgets from ift.tt/1UnmBVj. The landing page we’ll be creating can be found here: bit.ly/2imMqtd In this video tutorial we’ll be doing…

    My name is Mason Ellwood, and I’m currently working on Flatiron School’s Online Full Stack Web Development Program. Each week, I’ll be writing about my experience, what I’m learning, and tips on learning to code. So… today for the first time ever! I would like to introduce the new member of the Fyresite team, Mason…

    Having a smartphone or a tablet is something common these days. Therefore, it’s hard to imagine our day-to-day life without apps that make it much easier and simpler. Whether it’s social media, entertainment, dating, sports, time management, or even the weather, there is something for everyone. But an app that’s difficult to figure out how…

    Needless to say, the website has become the face of any company nowadays, regardless of its size or area of activity. Since the Internet is the go-to choice for most people, every business struggles to achieve an impeccable image online. Moreover, they tend to adopt the latest trends in communication to a certain extent. But…

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Style Guides For Web Projects: Tips & Guidelines

    via WordPress ift.tt/2eKDrgv

    Large design projects require style guides for branding, identity, and consistency in writing. But these large projects also deserve style guides for their websites too.

    A website style guide cover page elements that should be universal to a design. Consider things like buttons, page sections, typography, forms, and other related styles. With a web style guide these features are in one place to help other designers match the project’s style.

    In this post I’ll share tips for creating a usable web style guide that highlights all the stuff that helps designers the most. If you follow these guidelines you’re sure to create style guides that work well and cover all the important design features.

    Write Clear Statements

    Each page in the guide should be concise and to the point. Style guides should not be lengthy technical documents.

    They’re created as visual guidelines for designers & project managers, so the style guide’s layout should reflect that.

    Take a peek at MailChimp’s Email Design Guide. It’s easy to read as one vertical column streaming down the page.

    It also uses a clear table of contents for organizing the guide into sections. You can skip ahead to guidelines for images, fonts, layouts, or anything else.

    Notice how each section is concise and to the point. These style guides are not meant to be essays or philosophical debates. Designers just want to gather required information in the fewest amount of words.

    The Frontify brand guide is another fantastic example of a style guide on the web. It does have sections for site identity but this style guide is mostly for the website’s design features.

    You can browse through webfonts, colors, spacing, and each of these sections has internal links for sub-sections of the page.

    And notice how the colors page is crystal clear. The colors are neatly organized with color codes for HEX, RGB, CMYK, and PMS. You can even download digital color swatches directly as .ASE files.

    Clarity isn’t something you look for. It should be apparent from the very first pageload.

    Design your web style guides with clear intent and remove all excess content. Focus primarily on visuals and use writing to explain how these visuals should be implemented.

    These are some other well-organized style guides you can look into:

    Organize Guides By Topic

    Think of a website’s style guide much like an online brand book. When you open the first page you should see a list of chapters and sections to browse.

    You can add sections with a table of contents and make it easy for anyone to skip around. But you’ll also have to consider what to cover and how to split up the guide.

    All style guides focus on style but websites should have certain sections in their guides:

    Typography

    Colors/textures

    Iconography

    Layout & containers

    Buttons

    Forms

    Animation

    That last point is really important because UX animation is a hot topic in today’s digital ecosystem. Animation expert Val Head covered this in her blog stating unequivocally that animation “absolutely belongs in your style guides”.

    The above example from Marvel points to their animation guide. It’s a chapter nestled deep in their web style guide and it covers very specific guidelines for timing & easing.

    These animations can be applied to anything. Dropdown menus, animated buttons, slideshows, pretty much any element on the page that moves.

    If your web project uses animation then it should have a consistent theme. The same ideas apply to web typography, buttons, and form inputs.

    But how you structure the guide does matter. It’s the difference between a usable style guide and a jumbled mess of suggestions for designers.

    Take a look at Yelp’s style guide.

    They’re an Internet company so their style guide is only made for the web. It covers features called “patterns” which get the most attention in the floating sidebar.

    Also notice how their style guide is just one long page. You can keep scrolling and hitting different sections as you go. Navigation menus, page containers, buttons, and even custom objects all have their own sections.

    Different style guides place varying degrees of importance on different elements. You’ll have to make the call deciding which elements deserve the most attention in your guide.

    And just for good measure I’d like to share one not-so-organized example. The Code For America style guide uses a hidden menu that you need to click to open. But the menu only loads different pages, not different parts of the guide.

    So their style guide is literally one long stream of content with no glossary, table of contents, or any sort of useful browsing tool.

    Do not just plop everything onto one page and call it a day. It’s the worst way to “organize” anything, especially a complex style guide.

    Without picking on CFA I just want to use their example as what not to do in your own work. It’s also a good example of why organization really does make a difference.

    Use Visuals To Share Ideas

    Web style guides are visual in nature. They’re made for other designers to clone styles and common page elements. This means visual examples help a lot more than words.

    Add plenty of visuals to every section of the guide. These visuals should serve to demonstrate examples of whatever you’re covering whether it’s headers, image captions, or form inputs.

    My favorite example is the US Web Design Standards style guide. It’s one of the few things that bureaucracy didn’t ruin because it needs to be accessible to everyone.

    Each section includes plenty of visuals with optional code snippets. The alerts page is a pristine example of this.

    And the side navigation stays fixed all the way on every page so you constantly have access to the navigation.

    Buffer does something very similar in their style guide which is a bit smaller. But their visuals help to sell each element by showing how it can be used in a real-world scenario.

    Try to think practically when designing your style guides. People reading these guides want to implement real solutions and it helps to have something to study.

    Buffer’s style guide includes examples with live embedded elements on the page. These all include the CSS class and the type of feature whether it’s a blockquote or a social sharing button.

    And while we’re learning from examples I’ll drop this link to Drupal’s style guide. It uses almost no visual examples and the ones they do have are very limited.

    As you can tell it’s tough getting any real value from this guide. Not to say Drupal has poor taste in design or that their guide isn’t valuable.

    However the organization is poor and the lack of visuals really ruins comprehension.

    Web style guides are made for visuals on the web. So use plenty of these visuals when you’re actually creating the guide.

    Add Writing & Tone Guidelines

    Visuals are obviously needed for all visual aspects of a website. But most websites are made up of written content. This is why some style guides include sections on voice in writing.

    I’ll admit, this isn’t a huge area to concern yourself with.

    However it can make a big difference in the final product if you’re willing to put down voice guidelines for copywriters & bloggers. Especially if the site has a lot of written copy.

    A fine example is the TutsPlus guide covering tone for writers. This includes people who contribute to the blog and people who create premium courses.

    Notice these pages focus on how writers should create content. It covers very specific rules about pronouns, contractions, and addressing the reader directly.

    All of these rules work specifically for TutsPlus. Writing for a different blog may require a totally different ruleset. A content-heavy website would be foolish to not include a voice section in their style guide.

    You can learn just by studying live examples or reading articles on this subject. But the goal is to make a consistent theme with writing, just like how style guides aim for a consistent theme in design.

    But voice & tone style guides are unique to each site. Their layout and structure will be very different, and their content will vary drastically.

    Yes every site wants properly written content with no grammatical mistakes. But the tone, cadence, and technical style always vary.

    Take a look over this style manual for an idea of how you could structure your guide. This isn’t really a style guide, but it does follow a similar formula to study for page design and content structure.

    Parting Words

    Making a great style guide is all about organizing the most useful features into the best order. From there it’s just repetition until you have all the elements added.

    I hope this post can help designers working on their own web style guides. The first one you create probably won’t be awesome. But if you focus on improving the ease of use you’ll have a much easier time planning & constructing valuable style guides.

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    5 Must-Have Instagram Tools

    via WordPress ift.tt/2gM2osx

    Marketing on Instagram made easy (and measurable) with these 5 tools.

    5 Must-Have Instagram Tools

    Unlike Facebook, Instagram doesn’t exactly make it easy for marketers to do their jobs. These tools circumvent that problem.Source

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler – Smashing Magazine

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f7tBWv

    You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though.
    Did you know that we publish useful books and run
    friendly conferences — crafted for pros like
    yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf Barcelona,
    dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

    The way people consume information is constantly evolving. As web designers and developers, we keep up with all of the different screen shapes and sizes, learning to create beautiful, flexible software. Yet most of the available tools still don’t reflect the nature and diversity of the platform we’re building for: the browser.

    When I was making my first responsive website in 2012, I quickly realized how inefficient and time-consuming the constant browser window resizing was. I had just moved from Estonia to Australia, and with a newborn, time was very much a precious resource.

    I began looking for better ways to see the effects of my media queries.

    I came across Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool1 and was blown away. It cut my development time in half. Even though the app was quite basic, it quickly became indispensable, and I continued to use it for several years.

    2Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool. (View large version3)
    It was very much to my surprise that I never saw this brilliant concept taken any further. This, combined with the lack of features, set me on a journey to create the open-source virtual device lab XRespond74.

    5The new Smashing Magazine website previewed in XRespond (View large version6)
    Understanding The Problem Link

    When it comes to developing responsive websites, the problem lies in having to constantly resize the browser window. Although this unavoidable action feels second nature to most, it also masks aspects of design we don’t often appreciate — most notably, inconsistency and time management.

    With designs usually appearing in some combination of mobile, tablet and desktop context, anything in between is left in a somewhat uncertain state. And filling these gaps requires a lot of time and effort.

    The problem lies in the difficulty of looking at one screen size at a time, as opposed to getting an all-in-one overview of different screen sizes. When we’re building for a variety of screen types, it doesn’t make sense to view only a single instance of a design at any given time — we’d be unable to gain the context of how the styles of elements change across breakpoints.

    Current practices just don’t cater to these modern ways of developing. Fortunately, it’s not all bad news.

    Simple Solution Link

    XRespond74 is a virtual device lab for designing, developing and testing responsive websites. The idea is simple: It enables you to make website comparisons side by side, as if you had different devices on the wall in front of you.

    You don’t have to leave your desk, laptop or even favorite browser. And with zero setup, you can start comparing websites right away.

    8(View large version9)
    XRespond can help if you’re building a pattern library or a style guide, because you can focus on a single component at different screen sizes simultaneously. As you’d expect from a development tool, it works well with local servers.

    Just bear in mind that, as with any emulation, XRespond can’t compete with testing on real devices, but it will get you 90% of the way there — and in a fraction of the time.

    How To Use It? Link

    Enter a website address, click the button, and XRespond will automatically display the website on different virtual devices — which you can choose and customize as you see fit.

    XRespond works well with other development tools, notably one of my favorites: Browsersync10. Browsersync enables you to set up live reloads and synchronized scrolling — all simultaneously across virtual (and real) devices. This makes spotting problems simpler, because issues become more apparent.

    11Synchronized scrolling across devices with Browsersync (View large version12)
    What To Do If Your Website Won’t Load? Link

    Occasionally, you might run into a problem of your website failing to load. This most likely has to do with your website preventing itself from being loaded in an iframe. If you own the website, you can temporarily disable X-Frame-Options13 or the Content Security Policy14, depending on your setup.

    Conclusion Link

    I love XRespond — and not just because I love making it, but because it simplifies my life. I can spend less time and effort working, and use the spare time for something else. It’s given me an opportunity to improve the quality of my work. I hope you’ll find XRespond just as useful and will start enjoying the time it saves you.

    Feel free to share, and follow me15 on Twitter for updates. Cheers!

    (da, il, al)

    1 ift.tt/nneYeP

    2 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    3 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    4 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    5 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    6 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    7 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    8 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    9 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    10 ift.tt/22PaD97

    11 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    12 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    13 ift.tt/29rtd32

    14 ift.tt/2geVQUT

    15 twitter.com/indrekpaas

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    Indrek Paas

    Indrek is an ex-graphic designer, who half-way through his career turned to code and hasn’t looked back since. The past eight years have shaped his passion for responsive web design, accessibility, and performance. If it’s not the Web, it’s his love for exploring music and playing records.

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f8rYrS

    Grow Your Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Why it’s time to add mobile to your digital marketing master plan, plus 7 key strategies to help you boost your business growth on mobile social media.Source

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler – Smashing Magazine

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f7tBWv

    You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though.
    Did you know that we publish useful books and run
    friendly conferences — crafted for pros like
    yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf Barcelona,
    dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

    The way people consume information is constantly evolving. As web designers and developers, we keep up with all of the different screen shapes and sizes, learning to create beautiful, flexible software. Yet most of the available tools still don’t reflect the nature and diversity of the platform we’re building for: the browser.

    When I was making my first responsive website in 2012, I quickly realized how inefficient and time-consuming the constant browser window resizing was. I had just moved from Estonia to Australia, and with a newborn, time was very much a precious resource.

    I began looking for better ways to see the effects of my media queries.

    I came across Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool1 and was blown away. It cut my development time in half. Even though the app was quite basic, it quickly became indispensable, and I continued to use it for several years.

    2Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool. (View large version3)
    It was very much to my surprise that I never saw this brilliant concept taken any further. This, combined with the lack of features, set me on a journey to create the open-source virtual device lab XRespond74.

    5The new Smashing Magazine website previewed in XRespond (View large version6)
    Understanding The Problem Link

    When it comes to developing responsive websites, the problem lies in having to constantly resize the browser window. Although this unavoidable action feels second nature to most, it also masks aspects of design we don’t often appreciate — most notably, inconsistency and time management.

    With designs usually appearing in some combination of mobile, tablet and desktop context, anything in between is left in a somewhat uncertain state. And filling these gaps requires a lot of time and effort.

    The problem lies in the difficulty of looking at one screen size at a time, as opposed to getting an all-in-one overview of different screen sizes. When we’re building for a variety of screen types, it doesn’t make sense to view only a single instance of a design at any given time — we’d be unable to gain the context of how the styles of elements change across breakpoints.

    Current practices just don’t cater to these modern ways of developing. Fortunately, it’s not all bad news.

    Simple Solution Link

    XRespond74 is a virtual device lab for designing, developing and testing responsive websites. The idea is simple: It enables you to make website comparisons side by side, as if you had different devices on the wall in front of you.

    You don’t have to leave your desk, laptop or even favorite browser. And with zero setup, you can start comparing websites right away.

    8(View large version9)
    XRespond can help if you’re building a pattern library or a style guide, because you can focus on a single component at different screen sizes simultaneously. As you’d expect from a development tool, it works well with local servers.

    Just bear in mind that, as with any emulation, XRespond can’t compete with testing on real devices, but it will get you 90% of the way there — and in a fraction of the time.

    How To Use It? Link

    Enter a website address, click the button, and XRespond will automatically display the website on different virtual devices — which you can choose and customize as you see fit.

    XRespond works well with other development tools, notably one of my favorites: Browsersync10. Browsersync enables you to set up live reloads and synchronized scrolling — all simultaneously across virtual (and real) devices. This makes spotting problems simpler, because issues become more apparent.

    11Synchronized scrolling across devices with Browsersync (View large version12)
    What To Do If Your Website Won’t Load? Link

    Occasionally, you might run into a problem of your website failing to load. This most likely has to do with your website preventing itself from being loaded in an iframe. If you own the website, you can temporarily disable X-Frame-Options13 or the Content Security Policy14, depending on your setup.

    Conclusion Link

    I love XRespond — and not just because I love making it, but because it simplifies my life. I can spend less time and effort working, and use the spare time for something else. It’s given me an opportunity to improve the quality of my work. I hope you’ll find XRespond just as useful and will start enjoying the time it saves you.

    Feel free to share, and follow me15 on Twitter for updates. Cheers!

    (da, il, al)

    1 ift.tt/nneYeP

    2 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    3 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    4 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    5 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    6 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    7 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    8 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    9 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    10 ift.tt/22PaD97

    11 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    12 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    13 ift.tt/29rtd32

    14 ift.tt/2geVQUT

    15 twitter.com/indrekpaas

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    Tweet itShare on Facebook

    Indrek Paas

    Indrek is an ex-graphic designer, who half-way through his career turned to code and hasn’t looked back since. The past eight years have shaped his passion for responsive web design, accessibility, and performance. If it’s not the Web, it’s his love for exploring music and playing records.

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f8rYrS

    Grow Your Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Why it’s time to add mobile to your digital marketing master plan, plus 7 key strategies to help you boost your business growth on mobile social media.Source

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Let’s Make Building Responsive Websites Simpler – Smashing Magazine

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f7tBWv

    You know, we use ad-blockers as well. We gotta keep those servers running though.
    Did you know that we publish useful books and run
    friendly conferences — crafted for pros like
    yourself? E.g. our upcoming SmashingConf Barcelona,
    dedicated to smart front-end techniques and design patterns.

    The way people consume information is constantly evolving. As web designers and developers, we keep up with all of the different screen shapes and sizes, learning to create beautiful, flexible software. Yet most of the available tools still don’t reflect the nature and diversity of the platform we’re building for: the browser.

    When I was making my first responsive website in 2012, I quickly realized how inefficient and time-consuming the constant browser window resizing was. I had just moved from Estonia to Australia, and with a newborn, time was very much a precious resource.

    I began looking for better ways to see the effects of my media queries.

    I came across Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool1 and was blown away. It cut my development time in half. Even though the app was quite basic, it quickly became indispensable, and I continued to use it for several years.

    2Matt Kersley’s Responsive Web Design Testing Tool. (View large version3)
    It was very much to my surprise that I never saw this brilliant concept taken any further. This, combined with the lack of features, set me on a journey to create the open-source virtual device lab XRespond74.

    5The new Smashing Magazine website previewed in XRespond (View large version6)
    Understanding The Problem Link

    When it comes to developing responsive websites, the problem lies in having to constantly resize the browser window. Although this unavoidable action feels second nature to most, it also masks aspects of design we don’t often appreciate — most notably, inconsistency and time management.

    With designs usually appearing in some combination of mobile, tablet and desktop context, anything in between is left in a somewhat uncertain state. And filling these gaps requires a lot of time and effort.

    The problem lies in the difficulty of looking at one screen size at a time, as opposed to getting an all-in-one overview of different screen sizes. When we’re building for a variety of screen types, it doesn’t make sense to view only a single instance of a design at any given time — we’d be unable to gain the context of how the styles of elements change across breakpoints.

    Current practices just don’t cater to these modern ways of developing. Fortunately, it’s not all bad news.

    Simple Solution Link

    XRespond74 is a virtual device lab for designing, developing and testing responsive websites. The idea is simple: It enables you to make website comparisons side by side, as if you had different devices on the wall in front of you.

    You don’t have to leave your desk, laptop or even favorite browser. And with zero setup, you can start comparing websites right away.

    8(View large version9)
    XRespond can help if you’re building a pattern library or a style guide, because you can focus on a single component at different screen sizes simultaneously. As you’d expect from a development tool, it works well with local servers.

    Just bear in mind that, as with any emulation, XRespond can’t compete with testing on real devices, but it will get you 90% of the way there — and in a fraction of the time.

    How To Use It? Link

    Enter a website address, click the button, and XRespond will automatically display the website on different virtual devices — which you can choose and customize as you see fit.

    XRespond works well with other development tools, notably one of my favorites: Browsersync10. Browsersync enables you to set up live reloads and synchronized scrolling — all simultaneously across virtual (and real) devices. This makes spotting problems simpler, because issues become more apparent.

    11Synchronized scrolling across devices with Browsersync (View large version12)
    What To Do If Your Website Won’t Load? Link

    Occasionally, you might run into a problem of your website failing to load. This most likely has to do with your website preventing itself from being loaded in an iframe. If you own the website, you can temporarily disable X-Frame-Options13 or the Content Security Policy14, depending on your setup.

    Conclusion Link

    I love XRespond — and not just because I love making it, but because it simplifies my life. I can spend less time and effort working, and use the spare time for something else. It’s given me an opportunity to improve the quality of my work. I hope you’ll find XRespond just as useful and will start enjoying the time it saves you.

    Feel free to share, and follow me15 on Twitter for updates. Cheers!

    (da, il, al)

    1 ift.tt/nneYeP

    2 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    3 ift.tt/2xQMKUH

    4 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    5 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    6 ift.tt/2gK6Rfo

    7 ift.tt/2vOBNp6

    8 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    9 ift.tt/2vOUfy0

    10 ift.tt/22PaD97

    11 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    12 ift.tt/2vOUgC4

    13 ift.tt/29rtd32

    14 ift.tt/2geVQUT

    15 twitter.com/indrekpaas

    ↑ Back to top

    Tweet itShare on Facebook

    Indrek Paas

    Indrek is an ex-graphic designer, who half-way through his career turned to code and hasn’t looked back since. The past eight years have shaped his passion for responsive web design, accessibility, and performance. If it’s not the Web, it’s his love for exploring music and playing records.

    Source link

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    via WordPress ift.tt/2f8rYrS

    Grow Your Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Social Media Marketing on Mobile: Grow You Business with These 7 Mobile Content Strategies

    Why it’s time to add mobile to your digital marketing master plan, plus 7 key strategies to help you boost your business growth on mobile social media.Source

  • DesamarkSEO posted a photo:

    Google Analytics Exam Answers 2017


    Mediante SEMrush nos permitirá identificar rápidamente tus principales competidores en cuanto a tráfico orgánico y de pago. Dentro de la herramienta en la izquierda tienes una opción que se llama “Investigación orgánica” (organic search, si usas la versión en inglés). Con SEMRush esto lo usaremos cuando tenemos una página que compite con nosotros y queremos obtener información […]

    Este artículo es un contenido original del Blog de SEO y Marketing online en Bilbao - Desamark

    Repost
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pYZiHsRBpA ** Desamark ** www.desamark.com/

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    via WordPress ift.tt/2vQQeJd
    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    Guys, do you have trouble matching colored clothes and shoes? If you do, this color combination guide might be able to help. Discovered on…Source

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    via WordPress ift.tt/2vQQeJd
    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    Guys, do you have trouble matching colored clothes and shoes? If you do, this color combination guide might be able to help. Discovered on…Source

  • spacemike posted a photo:

    Yellow Garden Spider

    Looks a little scarier than it actually is -- a common yellow garden spider, harmless to people and animals, not so much to other insects.

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    via WordPress ift.tt/2vQQeJd
    For Guys: A Quick & Easy Color Combination Guide For Men’s Clothing – DesignTAXI.com

    Guys, do you have trouble matching colored clothes and shoes? If you do, this color combination guide might be able to help. Discovered on…Source

  • spacemike posted a photo:

    Yellow Garden Spider

    Looks a little scarier than it actually is -- a common yellow garden spider, harmless to people and animals, not so much to other insects.

  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Public Invited to Design Solutions to Our City’s Biggest Issues

    via WordPress ift.tt/2wcp1w7

    The D4SD challenge asks “How do we create a San Diego where we all move freely?” Photo by iStock_CrackerClips.

    Helping to solve complex urban problems in a way that puts people first, the UC San Diego Design Lab has launched a city-wide civic design challenge called “Design for San Diego,” or D4SD for short. The challenge seeks to harness the power of crowdsourcing and human-centered design to address concerns with transportation and mobility in San Diego.

    The D4SD challenge will take place through a series of in-person events and a digital public platform, where participants can network with other innovators interested in improving the city around the central question of “How do we create a San Diego where we all move freely?”

    Steven Dow, assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego who is directing D4SD as part of the Qualcomm Institute-based Design Lab, said the challenge is focused on four related areas:

    enhancing the commuter experience,

    promoting walkable and bike-able communities,

    improving accessibility,

    and preparing for a future with autonomous vehicles.

    The challenge is presented by the Design Lab in partnership with SCALE SD and the Design Forward Alliance, with support from the City of San Diego.

    On Sept. 21, SCALE SD will host the D4SD kick-off event at Downtown Works featuring San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and Design Lab Director Don Norman. The challenge begins the next day, Sept. 22, with a design sprint and hackathon, also at Downtown Works, for participants to generate ideas, form teams and rapidly prototype a concept.

    Teams that enter the challenge will showcase their solutions on Oct. 25-26 at the Design Forward 2017 Summit in Liberty Station.

    The best solutions will earn prizes and private one-on-one meetings with startup investors.

    Throughout the process, participants will have opportunities to work with and learn from UC San Diego Design Lab educators and the City of San Diego data science team, using the city’s Open Data portal.

    Dow, who received a 2015 National Science Foundation CAREER award to study collective innovation, hopes the D4SD challenge will productively bridge the best aspects of collaboration and competition by “helping to bring people together to explore a problem space but also motivating them to enter their best innovations in the contest.”

    A class that Dow taught at UC San Diego in the Spring quarter of 2017 helped identify the challenge topics, with students surveying San Diegans, attending meetups with city and community leaders, and conducting targeted interviews. Dow will also teach a Civic Design class this Fall. These students will take part in the challenge alongside the public signing up through the website.

    “D4SD presents a unique educational opportunity,” Dow said, “both for university students and for the city’s residents – to gain hands-on experience with real-world issues and participate in San Diego’s innovation community.”

    Dow also said the D4SD challenge is distinctive in being focused on local problems and solutions rather than national or global ones.

    Daniel Obodovski, co-founder of SCALE SD, a smart-city accelerator, said, “We are excited to be co-organizing this initiative. This is a great way to mobilize the best entrepreneurial, engineering and design talent we have in town to address some of the most pressing transportation and mobility challenges in our city. Can’t wait to see what they come up with.”

    James White of the Design Forward Alliance, co-chair of the Design Forward Summit, added: “Design Forward Alliance is proud to be supporting the inaugural civic design challenge. The challenge provides participants the opportunity to apply human-centered design and practice design doing, which is a fundamental tenet of the Design Forward Alliance. Our mission is to create a unified effort that promotes the value of professional design, design thinking and design doing for better outcomes in business, education, government and the San Diego community.”

    To learn more about the challenge and to register, as well as for event details, visit d4sd.org.

    Share

    UC San Diego’s Studio Ten 300 offers radio and television connections for media interviews with our faculty. For more information, email .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

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  • petermoss4 posted a photo:

    Better Business Bureau; BBB

    via WordPress ift.tt/2wcRpOr

    RANDY HUTCHINSON, Special for the Sun
    Published 10:17 a.m. CT Sept. 7, 2017

    Randy Hutchinson(Photo: Submitted photo)









    The Better Business Bureau in Baltimore issued a press release warning consumers about a website selling fake Pandora jewelry. The real company website is pandora.net. The look-a-like site was pandorapick.com. People learned about it through pop-up ads on social media.

    Some consumers who ordered items on the bogus website never got them. Others said jewelry they received was defective. It came from China.

    The BBB determined that there was no encryption on the page where buyers entered credit card numbers, putting the information at risk.

    On its website, Pandora notes that sellers of counterfeit merchandise:

    • May not adhere to standards and laws that prohibit forced and child labor.

    • May not manufacture products in accordance with health and safety laws, including those governing the use of toxic and other harmful substances.

    • Likely don’t pay taxes, duties or customs fees on their products.

    • Rarely deliver any kind of customer service after the sale. The counterfeit products don’t come with the warranties that accompany the real goods.



    In 2016, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development estimated that global imports of counterfeit and pirated goods amount to nearly half a trillion dollars a year. Knock-offs range from handbags to machine parts and chemicals, and can pose health hazards to users. Auto parts can fail, pharmaceuticals can make people sick, and toys can harm children.

    Colleen McKown identifies the signs a website may be fake in an article on cnbc.com titled “The American Greed Report: Online shopping scams: Eight signs you’re on a fake site.” One is poor website design, including poor quality photos, and sloppy and grammatically incorrect English. The fake Pandora website was riddled with grammatical errors.

    Other red flags include:

    • Too-steep discounts. If you see a handbag for $50 that isn’t sold for less than $100 on other websites, it’s likely a fake.

    • A suspect domain name. Most retail websites have simple URLs, often just the company name. Extra words like “deals” or “super discounts” indicate you’re probably not on the real website.

    • The website hasn’t been around very long. There are tools on the web for checking the age and previous versions of a website. Most established brand names and retailers have had websites for years.

    • You can’t pay with a credit or debit card. Beware if you have to wire payment or can only use a money order, bitcoin, cash or a pre-paid gift card. Credit cards provide protections in case something goes wrong that the other payment methods don’t.

    • Shady contact information. The BBB regularly warns that, no matter how great a website may look, if you can’t find a phone number and physical address it may not be legitimate. McKown says be cautious if the company’s email address is a yahoo account or you can only communicate with it by filling out an online form.

    • Unclear refund policy. Trustworthy retailers will make their policy clear to you. Untrustworthy ones will make it hard to find or hard to understand, or won’t have one at all.



    Finally, McKown and the BBB recommend you check reviews from other customers. Type the company name and “scam” or “complaints” into Google. You can also check the BBB’s report on the company for complaints and reviews filed by customers.

    Randy Hutchinson is president and chief executive officer of the Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South.

    Read or Share this story: ift.tt/2wcjaa8

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