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  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    1970 Topps - Mike Kekich #536 (Pitcher) - Autographed Baseball Card (New York Yankees)

    Michael Dennis Kekich (b. April 2, 1945 in San Diego, California) is a former pitcher in MLB who played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, New York Yankees, Cleveland Indians, Texas Rangers and Seattle Mariners in parts of 9 seasons spanning 1965–1977. In 1974, he played in Japan for the Nippon Ham Fighters.

    Kekich was a left-handed pitcher who began his career as a starter but later moved to the bullpen as a reliever.

    He had a modestly successful career in the Major Leagues, but he is best remembered for trading families with fellow Yankees pitcher Fritz Peterson before the 1973 season. The trade worked out better for Peterson, who later married Kekich's wife Susanne, than it did for Kekich, who soon broke up with Peterson's wife Marilyn.

    After his big league career ended, Kekich attempted a comeback in the Mexican League, but this proved unsuccessful.

    Career statistics:
    Win-Loss 39-51
    ERA - 4.59
    Strikeouts - 497

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/3042/col/1/yea/0/Mik...

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    2002 / 2003 - Topps 206 Mini Baseball Card / Series 3 / Sweet Caporal Blue - DEREK JETER #380B (Seats) (Shortstop) (New York Yankees)

    Derek Sanderson Jeter (b. June 26, 1974) is a former professional baseball shortstop and the incoming CEO and part owner of the Miami Marlins. Jeter played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership.

    He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter was the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and first among shortstops. In 2017, the Yankees retired his uniform number 2.

    The Yankees drafted Jeter out of high school in 1992, and he debuted in the major leagues at age 21 in 1995. The following year, he became the Yankees' starting shortstop, won the Rookie of the Year Award, and helped the team win the 1996 World Series. Jeter continued to contribute during the team's championship seasons of 1998–2000; he finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1998, recorded multiple career-high numbers in 1999, and won both the All-Star Game MVP and World Series MVP Awards in 2000. He consistently placed among the AL leaders in hits and runs scored for most of his career, and served as the Yankees' team captain from 2003 until his retirement in 2014. Throughout his career, Jeter contributed reliably to the Yankees' franchise successes. He holds many postseason records, and has a .321 batting average in the World Series.

    After his retirement, Jeter began to pursue business interests, including publishing. In 2017, he finalized a deal to become co-owner of the Miami Marlins.

    MLB statistics:
    Batting average - .310
    Hits - 3,465
    Home runs - 260
    RBI - 1,311

    Teams:
    New York Yankees (1995–2014)

    Career highlights and awards:
    14× All-Star (1998–2002, 2004, 2006–2012, 2014)
    5× World Series champion (1996, 1998–2000, 2009)
    World Series MVP (2000)
    AL Rookie of the Year (1996)
    5× Gold Glove Award (2004–2006, 2009–2010)
    5× Silver Slugger Award (2006–2009, 2012)
    2× AL Hank Aaron Award (2006, 2009)
    Roberto Clemente Award (2009)
    New York Yankees No. 2 retired
    New York Yankees captain (2003–2014)

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/2885/col/1/yea/0/Der...

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    2002 / 2003 - Topps 206 Mini Baseball Card / Series 3 / Sweet Caporal Blue - DEREK JETER #380A (Blue) (Shortstop) (New York Yankees)

    Derek Sanderson Jeter (b. June 26, 1974) is a former professional baseball shortstop and the incoming CEO and part owner of the Miami Marlins. Jeter played 20 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees. A five-time World Series champion, Jeter is regarded as a central figure of the Yankees' success of the late 1990s and early 2000s for his hitting, baserunning, fielding, and leadership.

    He is the Yankees' all-time career leader in hits (3,465), doubles (544), games played (2,747), stolen bases (358), times on base (4,716), plate appearances (12,602) and at bats (11,195). His accolades include 14 All-Star selections, five Gold Glove Awards, five Silver Slugger Awards, two Hank Aaron Awards, and a Roberto Clemente Award. Jeter was the 28th player to reach 3,000 hits and finished his career ranked sixth in MLB history in career hits and first among shortstops. In 2017, the Yankees retired his uniform number 2.

    The Yankees drafted Jeter out of high school in 1992, and he debuted in the major leagues at age 21 in 1995. The following year, he became the Yankees' starting shortstop, won the Rookie of the Year Award, and helped the team win the 1996 World Series. Jeter continued to contribute during the team's championship seasons of 1998–2000; he finished third in voting for the American League (AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1998, recorded multiple career-high numbers in 1999, and won both the All-Star Game MVP and World Series MVP Awards in 2000. He consistently placed among the AL leaders in hits and runs scored for most of his career, and served as the Yankees' team captain from 2003 until his retirement in 2014. Throughout his career, Jeter contributed reliably to the Yankees' franchise successes. He holds many postseason records, and has a .321 batting average in the World Series.

    After his retirement, Jeter began to pursue business interests, including publishing. In 2017, he finalized a deal to become co-owner of the Miami Marlins.

    MLB statistics:
    Batting average - .310
    Hits - 3,465
    Home runs - 260
    RBI - 1,311

    Teams:
    New York Yankees (1995–2014)

    Career highlights and awards:
    14× All-Star (1998–2002, 2004, 2006–2012, 2014)
    5× World Series champion (1996, 1998–2000, 2009)
    World Series MVP (2000)
    AL Rookie of the Year (1996)
    5× Gold Glove Award (2004–2006, 2009–2010)
    5× Silver Slugger Award (2006–2009, 2012)
    2× AL Hank Aaron Award (2006, 2009)
    Roberto Clemente Award (2009)
    New York Yankees No. 2 retired
    New York Yankees captain (2003–2014)

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/2885/col/1/yea/0/Der...

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    2009 Topps 206 / Mini Piedmont Gold Chrome (#3/50) - LOU GEHRIG #271 (Baseball Hall of Fame 1939) (New York Yankees)

    THE MOMENT - Yankee Stadium on Independence Day 1939. Though he knew he was dying, Gehrig announced to more than 60,000 Yankee Stadium fans in his farewell speech on Independence Day 1939, "Today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth."

    Henry Louis "Buster" Gehrig (born Heinrich Ludwig Gehrig; June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, from 1923 through 1939. Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, a trait that earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He was an All-Star seven consecutive times, a Triple Crown winner once, an American League Most Valuable Player twice, and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 RBI. In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number (4) retired by a team.

    He set several major league records during his career, including the most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez) and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr. in 1995. Gehrig's streak ended on May 2, 1939, when he voluntarily took himself out of the lineup to stunned fans after his play was hampered by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an incurable neuromuscular disorder now commonly referred to in North America as Lou Gehrig's disease. The disease forced him to retire at age 36 and was the cause of his death two years later.

    Gehrig was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association in 1969, and was the leading vote-getter on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999.

    MLB statistics:
    Batting average - .340
    Hits - 2,721
    Home runs - 493
    RBI - 1,995

    Teams:
    New York Yankees (1923–1939)

    Career highlights and awards:
    7× All-Star (1933–1939)
    6× World Series champion (1927, 1928, 1932, 1936–1938)
    2× AL MVP (1927, 1936)
    Triple Crown (1934)
    AL batting champion (1934)
    3× AL home run leader (1931, 1934, 1936)
    5× AL RBI leader (1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1934)
    Hit 4 home runs in one game on June 3, 1932
    New York Yankees captain (1935–1939)
    New York Yankees #4 retired
    Major League Baseball All-Century Team
    Major League Baseball All-Time Team
    Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Inducted 1939

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/2054/col/1/yea/0/Lou...

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    2002 / 2003 - Topps 206 Mini Baseball Card / Series 3 / Uzit - ALFONSO SORIANO #312 (Second Base / Outfielder) (New York Yankees)

    Alfonso Guilleard Soriano (b. January 7, 1976) is a Dominican former professional baseball left fielder and second baseman. He played in Major League Baseball for the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers, and Washington Nationals, and in Nippon Professional Baseball for the Hiroshima Toyo Carp.

    Soriano began his professional career with Hiroshima in 1996, but signed with the Yankees as a free agent in 1998 and was assigned to play in minor league baseball. The next year, he was the Most Valuable Player in the All-Star Futures Game, and made his MLB debut for the Yankees, with whom he would win two American League championships. The Yankees traded Soriano to the Rangers after the 2003 season, and the Rangers traded Soriano to the Nationals after the 2005 season. He signed a contract as a free agent with the Cubs before the 2007 season. The Cubs traded Soriano to the Yankees in 2013, and the Yankees released him in 2014.

    Soriano was a seven-time MLB All-Star, and won the All-Star Game MVP Award in 2004. He won the Silver Slugger Award four times. He played primarily as a second baseman for the Yankees and Rangers before being converted to an outfielder with the Nationals.

    Soriano is one of only 54 major league players to hit 400 or more career home runs, and was seventh among active players in home runs at the time of his retirement.

    He played in New York for five seasons. His first hit in MLB came in 1999 when he hit a game-winning home run against Norm Charlton of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. He finished in third place for Rookie of the Year honors in 2001. In the World Series that year, he hit the go-ahead home run off Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Curt Schilling in the seventh game, but Arizona won anyway when Luis Gonzalez hit his series-winning single on a cut fastball by closer Mariano Rivera.

    In 2002, Soriano became the second Yankee in franchise history to record 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in the same season (the first being Bobby Bonds in 1975), then repeated the feat in 2003. Also in 2002, he led the American League with 696 at bats, 209 hits, 92 extra base hits, 41 stolen bases, 128 runs and set a Yankees' team record for most at bats (696) and most strikeouts (157) in a season.

    Soriano announced his retirement from baseball on November 4, 2014.

    MLB statistics:
    Batting average - .270
    Hits - 2,095
    Home runs - 412
    RBI - 1,159

    Teams:
    Hiroshima Toyo Carp (1997)
    New York Yankees (1999–2003)
    Texas Rangers (2004–2005)
    Washington Nationals (2006)
    Chicago Cubs (2007–2013)
    New York Yankees (2013–2014)

    Career highlights and awards:
    7× All-Star (2002–2008)
    4× Silver Slugger Award (2002, 2004–2006)
    AL stolen base leader (2002)

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/5529/col/1/yea/0/Alf...

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    1952 Bowman - Ed Lopat #17 (Pitcher) (b. 21 Jun 1918 - d. 15 Jun 1992 at age 73) - Autographed Baseball Card (New York Yankees)

    Edmund Walter Lopat (originally Lopatynski) (b. June 21, 1918 – d. June 15, 1992 at age 73) was a MLB pitcher, coach, manager, front office executive, and scout. He was sometimes known as "The Junk Man," but better known as "Steady Eddie," a nickname later given to Eddie Murray.

    A left-hander, Lopat made his Major League pitching debut on April 30, 1944, playing for the Chicago White Sox. He was traded to the New York Yankees on February 24, 1948 for Aaron Robinson, Bill Wight, and Fred Bradley. From 1948 to 1953 he was the third of the "Big Three" of the Yankees' pitching staff, together with Allie Reynolds and Vic Raschi. He pitched in the All-Star Game in 1951 for the American League.

    Lopat pitched for five victorious Yankees teams in the World Series during his career, in 1949-1953.

    On July 30, 1955, he was traded to the Baltimore Orioles for Jim McDonald and cash, finishing out the season and retiring.

    In 1963 Lopat was tapped to manage the Kansas City Athletics and continued in this role until June 11, 1964. His Major League managerial record was 90-124 (.421).

    Career statistics:
    Win–loss record 166–112
    ERA - 3.21
    Strikeouts - 859

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/3502/col/1/yea/0/Ed-...

  • Mambo'Dan posted a photo:

    49th Homer of the Season

    Aaron Judge's 49th homer ties Mark McGwire's rookie record

  • Mambo'Dan posted a photo:

    Aaron Judge #99

  • Baseball Autographs Football Coins posted a photo:

    1970 Topps - Curt Blefary #297 (First Base / Outfield) (b. 5 Jul 1943 - d. 28 Jan 2001 at age 57) (PSA Certified) - Autographed Baseball Card (New York Yankees)

    Curtis Leroy "Clank" Belfary (b. July 5, 1943 – d. January 28, 2001 at age 57) was a professional baseball left fielder who played in Major League Baseball for the Baltimore Orioles (1965–1968), Houston Astros (1969), New York Yankees (1970–1971), Oakland Athletics (1971–1972) and the San Diego Padres (1972). A native of Brooklyn, New York, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

    In his debut year of 1965, Blefary hit .260 with 22 home runs and 70 RBI, winning both the American League Rookie of the Year and The Sporting News Rookie of the Year awards. The following season, he was a member of the Orioles team that won the 1966 World Series.

    Nicknamed "Clank" by Frank Robinson, in part for his below-average fielding abilities, Blefary started his career in the outfield, tried at first base, then switched to catcher, in an effort to keep his bat in the lineup. On April 27, 1968, he caught Tom Phoebus' no-hitter against the Red Sox. Blaming his constant defensive shuffling for his offensive decline, Blefary was sent to Houston in 1969 in the deal that brought Mike Cuellar to the Orioles.

    On May 4, 1969, Blefary, who was playing first base participated in all of the Astros record-tying seven double plays in a game against the San Francisco Giants.

    After a full season with the Astros, at the end of the 1969 season he was traded to the Yankees for fellow Brooklynite, Joe Pepitone.

    Blefary was used as a part-time player by the Yankees, and in 1971 he was traded to the Athletics and in 1972 to the Padres. After retiring in 1972, he tried unsuccessfully to continue his career in baseball as a coach.

    MLB statistics:
    Batting average - .237
    Home runs - 112
    RBI - 382

    Career highlights and awards:
    World Series champion (1966)
    AL Rookie of the Year (1965)

    Link to all of his issued baseball cards - www.tradingcarddb.com/Person.cfm/pid/525/col/1/yea/0/Curt...

  • straubted posted a photo:

    Joseph Jermyn's Farm and Yankee Stadium

    1923 ad extolling the virtues of Toncan.

    A nice depiction of Yankee Stadium's original, but never completed design, and also a mention of Joseph Jermyn's farm In Pennsylvania.

    A description Toncan Iron is found in the attached Republic Steel 1937 booklet:

    archive.org/details/ThePathToSheetMetalPermanenceToncanIron

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17

  • M.C. O'Connor posted a photo:

    Southside Johnny w/ Bernie Williams | Bar A | Belmar | 8.

    8.25.17