Noaa

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

"Noaa" in the news

People discussing "Noaa"

Noaa videos

"Noaa" images

  • csete posted a photo:

    satnogs_15307_2017-09-06T14-39-54

  • csete posted a photo:

    satnogs_15306_2017-09-06T12-58-52

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    GOES-16 Geocolor of Hurricane Irma on September 6, 2017

    GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Hurricane Irma approaching Anguilla at about 7:00 a.m. EDT on September 6, 2017.

    According to the latest information from NOAA's National Hurricane Center (issued at 8:00 a.m. EDT on September 6), Irma was located about 15 miles west-southwest of Anguilla and moving toward the west-northwest near 16 miles per hour. This general motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days. On the forecast track, the extremely dangerous core of Irma will move over portions of the northern Virgin Islands today, pass near or just north of Puerto Rico this afternoon or tonight, and pass near or just north of the coast of the Dominican Republic Thursday (9/7).

    Irma's maximum sustained winds remain near 185 mph with higher gusts, making it a category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are likely during the next day or two, but Irma is forecast to remain a powerful category 4 or 5 hurricane during the next couple of days.

    Image Credit: CIRA

    For the latest information on Hurricane Irma, including storm-related hazards likely to affect land, visit the National Hurricane Center's website at www.nhc.noaa.gov.

    Please note: GOES-16 data are currently experimental and under-going testing and hence should not be used operationally.

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    GOES-16 Infrared of Category 5 Hurricane Irma

    GOES-16 captured this infrared imagery of category 5 hurricane Irma bearing down on the Leeward Islands on September 5, 2017. Note the gravity wave pattern emanating outward.

    Irma was centered at 2 p.m. EDT on September 5, 2017, about 180 miles east of the Antigua, moving toward the west near 14 mph. Reports from an Air Force Hurricane Hunter aircraft indicate that the maximum sustained winds have increased to near 185 mph with higher gusts.

    On the forecast track, the extremely dangerous core of Irma is forecast to move over portions of the northern Leeward Islands tonight and early Wednesday.

    Credit: NASA SPoRT

  • EUMETSAT posted a photo:

    Hurricane Irma

    Composite image of category 5 Hurricane Irma, the strongest storm to ever form in the Atlantic, approaching the Carribbean, followed closely by tropical storm Jose to the south-east, at 06:00 UTC on Wednesday, 6 September 2017.

    Updates and advisories on this storm can be found on the GDACS website.

    Infrared data from the geostationary satellites of EUMETSAT, JMA and NOAA overlays a computer-generated model of the Earth, containing NASA's Blue Marble Next Generation imagery.

    Image free to download and use, providing the following attribution statement is displayed "Copyright: 2017 EUMETSAT"

    See more examples of weather phenomena and environmental events observed by EUMETSAT's fleet of weather satellites.

  • csete posted a photo:

    satnogs_15248_2017-09-05T13-10-16

  • csete posted a photo:

    satnogs_15249_2017-09-05T14-51-39

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    JPSS-1 Arrives at Vandenberg

    After more than 16 hours on the road, JPSS-1 arrives at the Astrotech Processing Facility at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, the spacecraft’s new home until launch this November.

    One of the nation’s premiere gateways to space, Vandenberg is a storied launch facility with a long history of working closely with NOAA and NASA.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Final Checks Prior to JPSS-1 Shipment

    Ball Aerospace engineers and technicians perform final checks on JPSS-1 in the cleanroom prior to shipment to Vandenberg Air Force Base.

    Prior to shipping, all of the satellite’s deployable appendages, such as the solar array, are stowed against its body, and protective covers are put around them.


    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Astrotech Processing Facility

    Once the JPSS-1 is safely inside the Astrotech Processing Facility, the satellite’s instruments will go through additional pre-launch testing. Then, just prior to the big day, the satellite will be encapsulated within the United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket that will take it on its final journey -- to space!

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Bagging JPSS-1 in Protective Wrapping for Shipment

    The Ball Aerospace team begins bagging the JPSS-1 satellite with protective wrapping in preparation for shipment from Colorado to Vandenberg Air Force Base.

    The "bag" in which the satellite is wrapped is designed to protect it from electrostatic charges. Arcing from electrostatic discharge (ESD) can damage sensitive electronics.The cover material protects the satellite from ESD.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Unhitching JPSS-1 Transport Container After Arrival at Vandenberg AirForce Base

    Before JPSS-1 launches into space this November, it had to travel from Colorado to California.

    Brock Chohon, a mechanical technician with Ball Aerospace joins his colleagues in unhitching JPSS-1’s transport container from the flatbed once it arrives at Vandenberg Air Force Base. Getting the satellite off the truck, however, is not a simple process. More than a dozen technicians climb over the huge tractor trailer as they unhitch, unlatch, and disconnect the transport container from the rig.


    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    JPSS-1 RV Escort

    A recreational vehicle carrying teams from Ball and NASA escorts the truck carrying the satellite to Vandenberg. These teams maintain environmental conditions, such as humidity and temperature, within the shipping container and communicate with the driver and their colleagues awaiting the satellite’s arrival.

    Read more about JPSS-1's road to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    JPSS-1 Transport t Vandenberg

    A truck carrying the shipping crate containing JPSS-1 leaves the Ball facility and begins its 1,200-mile journey to California's Vandenberg Air Force Base.

    Read more about JPSS-1's road to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Cover

    Artist's rendering of the JPSS-1 satellite in orbit.

    JPSS-1 is first in a series of Joint Polar Satellite System spacecraft. Its mission is to gather vital scientific data about the land, oceans, and atmosphere to enhance the accuracy of long-range forecasts; track severe weather such as hurricanes, blizzards, and droughts; and monitor the oceans and changes on Earth’s surface from 512 miles above in space.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    JPSS-1 Guided on to Trailer

    Suspended by chains above the floor, members of the Ball team guide the crate on to the trailer in preparation for its trip to California.

    The shipping container is constructed of a steel base and aluminum walls. The satellite is cantilevered horizontally inside the container and mounted on spring rails to isolate the satellite from shock and vibration during transport.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Transporting JPSS-1 to its Shipping Container

    Ball Aerospace engineers and technicians transport the JPSS-1 satellite to its shipping container.

    Even though the satellite weighs 5,000 pounds (or 2.5 tons), transporting the spacecraft is a delicate operation. One wrong move could damage JPSS-1's sensitive instruments.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • NOAASatellites posted a photo:

    Encapsulation of JPSS-1

    During encapsulation, the JPSS-1 satellite will be folded into launch position and then enclosed inside the two halves of the rocket fairing atop the Delta II launch vehicle.

    Read more about JPSS-1's transport to launch at www.nesdis.noaa.gov/JPSS-1

  • H.Viegas posted a video:

    Irma

  • Coast Guard News posted a photo:

    Cutter Healy 2017 Arctic patrol

    Two remotely operated sailing vehicles transit the southern Chukchi Sea Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, following a calibration rendezvous with a crew aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Healy..
    .
    Calibration opportunities, which are limited to moored technologies and shipboard equipment, ensure the vehicles collect accurate and quality measurements..
    .
    U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Amanda Norcross