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  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    DuBois describes his work in the White House.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    Audience members had the chance to ask questions.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    Keynote speaker, John J. DiIulio, Jr., who is the
    Frederic Fox Leadership professor of politics, religion, and civil society at University of Pennsylvania applauds the panelists.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    DuBois and Moore discuss religious pluralism.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    Moore (left) and Lantos Swett (right) discuss the role of storytelling in breaking religious barriers.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    Panelists included (left to right) William A. Galston, the Ezra K. Zilkha chair and senior fellow in Governance Studies, David Gregory, a political analyst and author of “How’s Your Faith?: An Unlikely Spiritual Journey,” Joshua DuBois, the CEO of Values Partnerships, Russell Moore, the president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, and Katrina Lantos Swett, the president of the Lantos Foundation for Human Rights & Justice.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • BrookingsInst posted a photo:

    The panelists take audience questions.

    Deep and increasingly bitter polarization along partisan, ideological, and religious lines seems to have become the norm in today’s America. This polarization has left many Americans feeling they share little to no common ground with their neighbors. The public discourse around the right to freedom of religion—and its role in protecting people of all faiths, or no faith—is illustrative of contemporary social division. Many fear that if this development continues, the shared understanding of Americans’ basic freedoms and rights will be threatened.

    On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic. The event convened leading thinkers of diverse viewpoints in a dialogue on present-day threats to our nation’s critical freedoms and to civil public discourse. How can a basis be restored for reasonable people to disagree publicly, even on questions of fundamental importance? At a time of increasing social strife, how can we forge a basis of mutual understanding and respect that enables us to live together with our deepest differences?

    The session began with a keynote address, followed by audience questions. After the keynote address, a panel followed and panelists took audience questions.

    Photo credit: Sharon Farmer

  • hagmannreport posted a photo:

    PRAGER: Leftism Is Not Liberalism

    What is the difference between a leftist and a liberal?
    Answering this question is vital to understanding the crisis facing America and the West today. Yet few seem able to do it. I offer the following as a guide.
    Here’s the first thing to know: The two have almost nothing in common.
    On...

    www.hagmannreport.com/from-the-wires/prager-leftism-is-no...

  • Phancurio posted a photo:

    The Ism Machine

    Producing the greatest happiness of the greatest number

  • felicianorton posted a photo:

    Noam Chomsky Cool Political Poster by Allriot.com



    www.allriot.com/
    Who was voted 2005’s “World’s Top Public Intellectual”? That’s right. You guessed it: Noam Chomsky. At 88 years old, Noam Chomsky is still a tour de force. Our political artwork pays tribute to the man of modern liberal philosophy.

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?

  • Birkbeck Media Services / Dominic Mifsud posted a photo:

    Law on Trial 2017: Public Lecture

    Professor Akeel Bilgrami: Why Does Liberalism Find It So Hard to Cope with Religious Identity?