Andrew Jones

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  • befitness posted a photo:

    The Fitness Model Without a Pulse

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  • smartfitnesspress posted a photo:

    The Fitness Model Without a Pulse

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNUATS8Jhuk


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  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Motor racing events

    New laws come into force on 10 April 2017 which will allow motor racing events to take place on closed public roads in England.

    The move could see small races hosted by local communities, bigger European rallies or even a future Monaco-style Grand Prix in an English city, offering huge economic benefits to local communities.

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "Britain is a world leader in the motorsport industry and this will further cement our position. There are already races of this kind in some areas of the British Isles which are incredibly popular, attracting thousands of spectators. New road races will boost local economies through increased tourism and hospitality, and offer community opportunities such as volunteering."

    The Motor Sports Association and the Auto-Cycle Union, the respective governing bodies for four- and two-wheel motor sport in the UK, will be authorised to issue permits for the races. They must consult the council, police and other local bodies and be fully satisfied that the event will be safe. Local authorities have the final say over whether a race can go ahead, and may require additional safety measures before, during or after the event as a condition of allowing a race to take place.

    Roads Minister Andrew Jones and Ben Taylor, Managing Director, International Motor Sports, with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup race car and a Mygale-Ford Formula 4 car.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Motor racing events

    New laws come into force on 10 April 2017 which will allow motor racing events to take place on closed public roads in England.

    The move could see small races hosted by local communities, bigger European rallies or even a future Monaco-style Grand Prix in an English city, offering huge economic benefits to local communities.

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "Britain is a world leader in the motorsport industry and this will further cement our position. There are already races of this kind in some areas of the British Isles which are incredibly popular, attracting thousands of spectators. New road races will boost local economies through increased tourism and hospitality, and offer community opportunities such as volunteering."

    The Motor Sports Association and the Auto-Cycle Union, the respective governing bodies for four- and two-wheel motor sport in the UK, will be authorised to issue permits for the races. They must consult the council, police and other local bodies and be fully satisfied that the event will be safe. Local authorities have the final say over whether a race can go ahead, and may require additional safety measures before, during or after the event as a condition of allowing a race to take place.

    Roads Minister Andrew Jones and Ben Taylor, Managing Director, International Motor Sports, with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup race car and a Mygale-Ford Formula 4 car.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Motor racing events

    New laws come into force on 10 April 2017 which will allow motor racing events to take place on closed public roads in England.

    The move could see small races hosted by local communities, bigger European rallies or even a future Monaco-style Grand Prix in an English city, offering huge economic benefits to local communities.

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "Britain is a world leader in the motorsport industry and this will further cement our position. There are already races of this kind in some areas of the British Isles which are incredibly popular, attracting thousands of spectators. New road races will boost local economies through increased tourism and hospitality, and offer community opportunities such as volunteering."

    The Motor Sports Association and the Auto-Cycle Union, the respective governing bodies for four- and two-wheel motor sport in the UK, will be authorised to issue permits for the races. They must consult the council, police and other local bodies and be fully satisfied that the event will be safe. Local authorities have the final say over whether a race can go ahead, and may require additional safety measures before, during or after the event as a condition of allowing a race to take place.

    Roads Minister Andrew Jones and Ben Taylor, Managing Director, International Motor Sports, with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup race car and a Mygale-Ford Formula 4 car.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Motor racing events

    New laws come into force on 10 April 2017 which will allow motor racing events to take place on closed public roads in England.

    The move could see small races hosted by local communities, bigger European rallies or even a future Monaco-style Grand Prix in an English city, offering huge economic benefits to local communities.

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "Britain is a world leader in the motorsport industry and this will further cement our position. There are already races of this kind in some areas of the British Isles which are incredibly popular, attracting thousands of spectators. New road races will boost local economies through increased tourism and hospitality, and offer community opportunities such as volunteering."

    The Motor Sports Association and the Auto-Cycle Union, the respective governing bodies for four- and two-wheel motor sport in the UK, will be authorised to issue permits for the races. They must consult the council, police and other local bodies and be fully satisfied that the event will be safe. Local authorities have the final say over whether a race can go ahead, and may require additional safety measures before, during or after the event as a condition of allowing a race to take place.

    Roads Minister Andrew Jones and Ben Taylor, Managing Director, International Motor Sports, with a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup race car and a Mygale-Ford Formula 4 car.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Stagecoach contactless payment

    Road Minister Andrew Jones attended the launch of contactless bus travel in Oxfordshire today (20 October). Stagecoach have taken the first step on their journey to provide contactless bus travel across the whole of their UK services. Pioneering the use of this technology on buses outside of London.

    All 180 Stagecoach buses in Oxfordshire and Oxford Tube fleet have been fitted with state-of-the-art ticket machines that allow customers to pay for travel with their contactless credit or debit card. The ticket machines also accept payment by Apple Pay and Android Pay, with no additional charge to customers who choose to use contactless payment.

    Over 4,000 ticket machines have already been ordered, with a further 3,200 scheduled to be delivered by 2017-18. By the end of 2018, the state-of-the-art technology will be live on all 7,200 of our buses in England, Scotland and Wales - equivalent to nearly one in four buses outside London.

    For more information, see Stagecoach.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Stagecoach contactless payment

    Road Minister Andrew Jones attended the launch of contactless bus travel in Oxfordshire today (20 October). Stagecoach have taken the first step on their journey to provide contactless bus travel across the whole of their UK services. Pioneering the use of this technology on buses outside of London.

    All 180 Stagecoach buses in Oxfordshire and Oxford Tube fleet have been fitted with state-of-the-art ticket machines that allow customers to pay for travel with their contactless credit or debit card. The ticket machines also accept payment by Apple Pay and Android Pay, with no additional charge to customers who choose to use contactless payment.

    Over 4,000 ticket machines have already been ordered, with a further 3,200 scheduled to be delivered by 2017-18. By the end of 2018, the state-of-the-art technology will be live on all 7,200 of our buses in England, Scotland and Wales - equivalent to nearly one in four buses outside London.

    For more information, see Stagecoach.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    UK Bus Summit 2017

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones MP, outlines the changes and challenges facing the UK bus industry and the UK Bus Summit 2017.

    Read the speech in full: UK Bus Summit speech

    Follow the conversation on Twitter using #UKBusSummit

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Disabled taxi users

    Taxi drivers face a fine of up to £1,000 if they refuse to transport wheelchair users or attempt to charge them extra, in a change to the law announced today (7 February 2017) by Transport Minister Andrew Jones.

    From 6 April taxi and private hire vehicle drivers will be obliged by law to:

    - transport wheelchair users in their wheelchair
    - provide passengers in wheelchairs with appropriate assistance
    - charge wheelchair users the same as non-wheelchair users

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "We want to build a country that works for everyone, and part of that is ensuring disabled people have the same access to services and opportunities as anyone else – including when it comes to travel. People who use wheelchairs are often heavily reliant on taxis and private hire vehicles and this change to the law will mean fair and equal treatment for all."

    The new rules will apply in England, Wales and Scotland affecting vehicles that are designated as wheelchair accessible and will apply to both taxis and private hire vehicles. All taxis in London and a significant number in most major urban centres are wheelchair accessible.

    In a change to the law, drivers found to be discriminating against wheelchair users face fines of up to £1,000 as part of provisions being enacted from the Equality Act. Drivers may also face having their taxi or private hire vehicle (PHV) licence suspended or revoked by their licencing authority. Drivers unable to provide assistance for medical reasons will be able to apply to their licensing authority for an exemption from the new requirements.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Disabled taxi users

    Taxi drivers face a fine of up to £1,000 if they refuse to transport wheelchair users or attempt to charge them extra, in a change to the law announced today (7 February 2017) by Transport Minister Andrew Jones.

    From 6 April taxi and private hire vehicle drivers will be obliged by law to:

    - transport wheelchair users in their wheelchair
    - provide passengers in wheelchairs with appropriate assistance
    - charge wheelchair users the same as non-wheelchair users

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones said:

    "We want to build a country that works for everyone, and part of that is ensuring disabled people have the same access to services and opportunities as anyone else – including when it comes to travel. People who use wheelchairs are often heavily reliant on taxis and private hire vehicles and this change to the law will mean fair and equal treatment for all."

    The new rules will apply in England, Wales and Scotland affecting vehicles that are designated as wheelchair accessible and will apply to both taxis and private hire vehicles. All taxis in London and a significant number in most major urban centres are wheelchair accessible.

    In a change to the law, drivers found to be discriminating against wheelchair users face fines of up to £1,000 as part of provisions being enacted from the Equality Act. Drivers may also face having their taxi or private hire vehicle (PHV) licence suspended or revoked by their licencing authority. Drivers unable to provide assistance for medical reasons will be able to apply to their licensing authority for an exemption from the new requirements.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Cycling and walking to work

    Thousands more people will be encouraged to cycle and walk to work thanks to a £64 million government investment, Transport Minister Andrew Jones announced today (26 January 2017).

    The funding will support local projects over 3 years from 2017 to 2020 and form part of a wider government package of more than £300 million to boost walking and cycling during the current parliament. By 2040 the government aims to make this part of everyday life and walking and cycling the natural choice for shorter journeys.

    The money will deliver:

    - more safety and awareness training for cyclists
    - extra secure cycle storage
    - bike repair and maintenance courses
    - road safety measures
    - mapping information for pedestrians
    - real time bus information through smart phone apps or information at bus stops
    - increased focus on car sharing clubs

    The funding will also target those looking to get back into work because access to transport and the cost of travel often restricts where people can look for work and their ability to attend interviews. They will also benefit from discount bus travel and bike loans.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Cycling and walking to work

    Thousands more people will be encouraged to cycle and walk to work thanks to a £64 million government investment, Transport Minister Andrew Jones announced today (26 January 2017).

    The funding will support local projects over 3 years from 2017 to 2020 and form part of a wider government package of more than £300 million to boost walking and cycling during the current parliament. By 2040 the government aims to make this part of everyday life and walking and cycling the natural choice for shorter journeys.

    The money will deliver:

    - more safety and awareness training for cyclists
    - extra secure cycle storage
    - bike repair and maintenance courses
    - road safety measures
    - mapping information for pedestrians
    - real time bus information through smart phone apps or information at bus stops
    - increased focus on car sharing clubs

    The funding will also target those looking to get back into work because access to transport and the cost of travel often restricts where people can look for work and their ability to attend interviews. They will also benefit from discount bus travel and bike loans.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Cycling and walking to work

    Thousands more people will be encouraged to cycle and walk to work thanks to a £64 million government investment, Transport Minister Andrew Jones announced today (26 January 2017).

    The funding will support local projects over 3 years from 2017 to 2020 and form part of a wider government package of more than £300 million to boost walking and cycling during the current parliament. By 2040 the government aims to make this part of everyday life and walking and cycling the natural choice for shorter journeys.

    The money will deliver:

    - more safety and awareness training for cyclists
    - extra secure cycle storage
    - bike repair and maintenance courses
    - road safety measures
    - mapping information for pedestrians
    - real time bus information through smart phone apps or information at bus stops
    - increased focus on car sharing clubs

    The funding will also target those looking to get back into work because access to transport and the cost of travel often restricts where people can look for work and their ability to attend interviews. They will also benefit from discount bus travel and bike loans.

    See news story on GOV.UK for further information.

  • Justin Merrigan posted a photo:

    7.14 Cambria Image 279

  • Justin Merrigan posted a photo:

    Hibernia Image 316 JPM

  • Justin Merrigan posted a photo:

    7.8 Hibernia 335

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Changes to the drink drive rehabilitation course

    Drink drivers will learn about the dangers of drug driving as part of a new pilot course starting today (24 October 2016).

    The Department for Transport is trialing the addition of drug driving education to the existing rehabilitation courses in England and Wales for people convicted of driving while over the alcohol limit.

    About 1,000 offenders will attend the combined courses which have been introduced after figures show a fifth of convicted drug drivers had previously been banned for drink driving.

    For more information, see the news story.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    2019 UCI Road World Cycling Championships

    The sensational news, announced by UCI President Brian Cookson OBE, cements Yorkshire’s reputation as a world-class cycling destination.

    The joint bid by Welcome to Yorkshire, British Cycling, UK Sport and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport includes a £24 million commitment from government to the event and its legacy, as well as an additional £3 million of National Lottery funding from UK Sport. The government will invest £15 million of the budget to help develop 27 cycle sport facilities across the UK, which will leave a lasting legacy at grassroots level.

    See Department for Culture, Media and Sport's news story on GOV.UK.

  • Department for Transport (DfT) posted a photo:

    Swift card launches on the Midland rail network

    Transport minister Andrew Jones MP was in Birmingham to launch the Swift smartcard on to the Midlands rail network.

    For the first time commuters can now use the Midlands’ own smart card to go through ticket barriers in stations across the region.

    It has been introduced by Transport for West Midlands (TfWM), part of the West Midlands Combined Authority.

    The ticket can be used by 3,000 rail passengers currently signed up to the network direct debit scheme.

    Find out more:
    Transport minister Andrew Jones launches Swift card on Midland rail network