Amalgamated

Amalgamation

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  • @DailyCaller The evidence would disprove their claims & incriminate them. #Vault7 threw a giant wrench into their p… https://t.co/iXn4yASrqX
    1ChordWonder, USA at Wed, 21 Feb 05:32:49
  • RT @Aloha_Analytics: @Thomas1774Paine Russians? @SenSanders you were hacked by the DNC. #ActBlues< #Amalgamated #Awans #Clinton #DNCLeaks
    MonicaMelvin12, at Tue, 20 Feb 20:02:03
  • @Thomas1774Paine Russians? @SenSanders you were hacked by the DNC. #ActBlues< #Amalgamated #Awans #Clinton #DNCLeaks
    Aloha_Analytics, TX/HI at Tue, 20 Feb 19:37:16
  • Uhhh, this is looking better -> time to go 3D. More entertainment for the upcoming months >) #Lobes #Hierarchy… https://t.co/rEUfakl8Nu
    GeoRock92, Dublín, Irlanda at Tue, 20 Feb 12:22:43

Amalgamated videos

"Amalgamated" images

  • washington_area_spark posted a photo:

    D.C. transit union poses before joining Solidarity Day: 1981

    Officers and members of Amalgamated Transit Union Local 689 pose outside their office at 100 Indiana Avenue NW Washington, D.C. before joining more than 250,000 people gathered for a march on Washington September 19, 1981 sponsored by the AFL-CIO in opposition to President Ronald Reagan’s economic policies.

    From left to right: Eugene O’Neal, unidentified, Joseph Jackson, James M. Thomas, Jr, Melvin Broyles, unidentified, Maurice Waller, Herb Bynum, Warren Flowers, Joseph Taylor.

    The march was dubbed Solidarity Day and was the first mass march on Washington sponsored by the labor federation.

    It followed ten years of strikes and other resistance to employer policies designed to speed production and cut labor costs.

    Despite the bravado expressed during the march, the demonstration in retrospect was more of a funeral march.

    The long battles of the late 1960s and 1970s ended in defeat when President Ronald Reagon fired air traffic controllers earlier in 1981 after they staged a nationwide strike.

    Reagan’s action emboldened employers to hire permanent replacements during strikes and sent labor unions continuing on a downward spiral.

    In the early 1950s one in three U.S. workers was a union member. In 2015 it was one in ten.

    For more information and related images, see flic.kr/s/aHskgYYv5F

    Photograph by John A. Thomas. The image is courtesy of Craig Simpson.

  • washington_area_spark posted a photo:

    Transit unions at Solidarity Day: 1981

    Officers and members of Amalgamated Transit Union Locals 689 and 1300 from Washington and Baltimore join more than 250,000 people gathered on the Mall for a march on Washington September 19, 1981 sponsored by the AFL-CIO in opposition to President Ronald Reagan’s economic policies.

    From left to right: Eugene O’Neal, unidentified, Joseph Jackson, James M. Thomas, Jr, Melvin Broyles, unidentified, Maurice Waller, Herb Bynum, Warren Flowers, Joseph Taylor.

    The march was dubbed Solidarity Day and was the first mass march on Washington sponsored by the labor federation.

    It followed ten years of strikes and other resistance to employer policies designed to speed production and cut labor costs.

    Despite the bravado expressed during the march, the demonstration in retrospect was more of a funeral march.

    The long battles of the late 1960s and 1970s ended in defeat when President Ronald Reagon fired air traffic controllers earlier in 1981 after they staged a nationwide strike.

    Reagan’s action emboldened employers to hire permanent replacements during strikes and sent labor unions continuing on a downward spiral.

    In the early 1950s one in three U.S. workers was a union member. In 2015 it was one in ten.

    For more information and related images, see flic.kr/s/aHskgYYv5F

    Photograph by John A. Thomas. The image is courtesy of Craig Simpson.

  • washington_area_spark posted a photo:

    Exact fare implemented at D.C. Transit: 1968

    D.C. Transit bus operator Sergio B. Aponte holds up a book of scrip June 11, 1968 at the Western Bus Division.

    The scrip system was adopted in an effort to prevent late-night robberies of the drivers. The scrip system replaced the money that operators carried to make change for passengers.

    The implementation of the exact fare system in Washington, D.C. followed a two-week night service strike by operators following the killing of John Earl Talley at 20th and P Streets NW during a robbery.

    During the night work stoppage called by Amalgamated Transit Union Local 689, operators working during the day paid the wages of the striking night operators.

    Talley’s death led to the first major transit system in the country adopting the exact fare system after a wildcat strike and the subsequent refusal of bus operators to work at night.

    Previously, operators carried hundreds of dollars in coins and bills in order to make change for passengers.

    Under the scrip system, passengers would no longer receive immediate change, but would be issued a ticket that could be redeemed at one of the D.C. Transit sales offices.

    The operator punched a two-part envelope with the amount of the fare and the amount of the money received. He or she would then place the money in the envelope and tear off a punched ticket to give to the passenger and then place the envelope containing the money in the fare box.

    For more information and related images, see flic.kr/s/aHskpE2qGN

    The photographer is unknown. The image is an Associated Press wire photo obtained via an Internet sale.

  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Establishment Crap?

    New Holland Brewing held a Town Hall event on the millage elections for the Library and RAPID transit system. RAPID Board member Jack Hoffman is addressing the crowd in this shot.

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    ATU Solidarity

    RAPID Board member spent a few minutes with the ATU folks at New Holland Brewing after a Town Hall event.

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Waiting For Their 3 Minutes

    Citizens waiting to address the GR City Commission primarily about immigrations status and bus union negotiations.

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    ATU's Jay DeShaine @ GR City Commission

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Immigration Concerns @ GR City Commission

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Raised Fists In Unity

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    PARKING, You Are Killing Us!

    John Rothwell takes as swipe at the ridiculous GR parking situation at the City Commission meeting. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

  • washington_area_spark posted a photo:

    Striking Baltimore transit workers picket feds: 1943

    Six hundred striking members of the Amalgamated Association of Street Electric Railways Employees Union Local 1300 from Baltimore, Md. picket the Department of Labor June 4, 1943 in protest of the War Labor Board’s failure to enforce an order regarding their grievance procedure with the Baltimore Transit Company.

    The dispute began the previous year when the War Labor Board issued an order to govern the grievance procedure at the company. It read in part:

    “…a union employee if he so desires, may be accompanied by a representative of the union when taking up the matter with his line superintendent. If the dispute is not settled by such discussion, it is provided that a statement be drawn up by the employee or the union or both and that it be discussed with the general manager of the company or some other company official designated by him.”

    The company initially refused to comply stating that it didn’t want to deal with representatives of the union who were not employees. Implementation of this provision was stalled by the company for months.

    The Amalgamated, a minority union at that time, called a strike May 25, 1943 demanding the reinstatement of a discharged employee and the implementation of the War Labor Board’s grievance procedure.

    The strike crippled operations on two main streetcar lines that served wartime defense industry, but the transit company restored upwards of 90% of the service through overtime and temporary replacements of the minority strikers.

    Approximately 600 employees of the 1,250 workforce were members of the Amalgamated while an independent union had slightly more members.

    The War Labor Board’s grievance procedure language or something very similar to it is standard in the vast majority of labor contracts today, but was fiercely resisted by many companies previous to the 1950s.

    The strike ended June 7th when the company agreed to re-hire the individual in question in a different position and the War Labor Board agreed to consider the union and the company’s position on the grievance procedure.

    The strike cemented the Amalgamated’s position with workers at the company and it quickly supplanted the independent union that had previously dominated. Today the union is known as Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1300.

    For more information and related images, see flic.kr/s/aHsm7sLaJS

    The photographer is unknown. The image is an ACME News Service photograph obtained via an Internet auction.

  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Ghoul Of Schools

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Shame On You!

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Toss DeVos

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Cruella DeVos

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Betsy DeVos: Killer of Public Education

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    ANTIFA Arrives!

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    DeVos Is Not Welcome Here

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    DK Security

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  • PPWIII posted a photo:

    Double FU

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